Joe Lepore[accent]This month’s tips come from Joe Lepore, Director of Client Services in our Boston office. Joe is always focused on customer service and is a relationship builder, on both the client and candidate side. He cares about the right talent getting placed with the best companies in Boston and greater New England. When he is not in the office, he is likely seeking out live music or meandering the city.[/accent]

Tips for Job Seekers

  1. blog-tips-team-v3-300Google yourself.
    It is good to know what your web presence is and what potential employers will see if they look you up. Probably not wise to have that drinking picture from Vegas as your profile picture. I also suggest making your accounts private. The “work you” and “outside of work you” do not need to generate comparisons, so don’t leave anything out there you don’t want to speak about.
  2. Bring a notebook to the interview.
    Everyone will tell you to bring resumes (and really you should bring a few copies), but it shows so much to bring something to take notes on. Even if you do not end up writing anything down, it reflects well on you to be prepared. It also is a good spot to write down the questions you want to ask, just in case you forget.
  3. Dress to the client.
    The days of rocking a suit are slowing dying. Trust me, if you want a job in the financial sector, it makes sense. But if you are going into an advertising agency, it likely will be viewed as the incorrect culture fit (and you haven’t said a single word yet). You shouldn’t wear sneakers to any interview and almost never will it be fine to wear jeans. However, a nice business casual look is just as strong as the suit used to be. Check out the company site, look up profiles on LinkedIn and tailor your interview look to what you see.

Tips for Employers

  1. No snap judgments.
    Resumes and LinkedIn profiles only tell part of the story. Obviously if they are the wrong skill-set match, you will pass, but if they seem qualified, always meet them. Some people are just stronger in person. Some of the best resumes belong to the wrong candidates. You just never know, so don’t assume.
  2. Don’t rush the interview.
    Candidates are usually nervous as it is, and if you rush, they could panic or give up (and what if they were the right one?). It also can come across that you are disinterested or not taking it seriously. The candidate likely spent hours tweaking their resume and preparing questions and responses. The least you can do is let them show you why they are a great candidate.
  3. If they are the right one, pull the trigger.
    Candidates go off the market so much quicker these days, and although your role might be amazing, someone else likely has a similar opportunity. If you get that good vibe, trust the feeling and make the offer. Trust those instincts.

If you’re in need of digital marketing, creative or technology talent in the Boston market, connect with Joe on Twitter @jsphlpr or give him or a member of our Boston team a call at 877.662.7932.  Job seekers can search our nationwide jobs to see what’s available and employers looking for talent can submit a request to their local market.

 

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